Indian Boundary Park

The best discoveries are the kind you’re not expecting at all.

Indian Boundary Park

Biking home from the store in yesterday’s blissful sunshine, I took a longcut through the side streets near Touhy and Western. Lo and behold, as I cruised along ordinary streets lined with ordinary houses, I suddenly found this lovely mid-sized park, surrounded by several amazing period apartment buildings, full of people and life.

I was stunned. I spent about half a blissful hour walking around, investigating. I vowed to come back with my camera as soon as possible, which turned out to be today.

Park Castle apartments

The most amazing of the period apartments is the Park Castle, pictured at top. It’s an E-shaped building that turns its back to rushing Western Avenue, choosing instead to face the park. The designers went to quite a bit of trouble to make this building live up to its name, with turrets both massive and tiny, crenelated parapet walls and brick corbeling the length of the cornice. Some less impressive but still nice apartment blocks form a complete wall of architecture on the park’s eastern side, a graceful enclosure that is the very model of an “outdoor room”.

Magnificent quarter mile

Another period apartment building

The half-timbered apartment block on the park’s north side is lovely as well. A section of Estes Street was closed down to join its courtyards directly to the park. This was a change made in the 1960s, in imitation of the adjacent apartments on the east side, whose front courts directly abut the park.

The park features a massive playlot with a climbing complex; it is supposed to mimic an Indian village but its wooden construction brings to mind a frontier fort, ironically enough. A pair of metal plaques inset into massive granite rocks tell the story of the play lot and the Indian Boundary Line, a treaty line set up in 1816 and occupied by the Potawatomie Indians (and having lived in Milwaukee 7 years, I recognized that the plaque doesn’t use the most common spelling of the name.) Typical of American dealings with the natives, the treaty only lasted till 1833. Land for the park was first acquired in 1915.

Fort Indian Treaty!

Indian Boundary Park headquarters

A Tudor Gothic field house, from 1929, is the park’s headquarters, and hosts various classes and events. A steady stream of park visitors was entering and leaving the building as I passed by.

And in the park’s opposite corner is… a zoo?

Lone resident

Yep, it’s a children’s petting zoo, normally occupied by goats, sheep and the like. Aside from this adolescent goose, it’s empty at present; I don’t know if it’s just for the winter or a semi-permanent closure.

There’s more — tennis courts, a water play sprayer thing — but I don’t mean to just make a laundry list of amenities. This is a lovely park, one of the prettiest and most charming I’ve found in Chicago. It has the right mix of fields and trees, development and grassland, architecture and nature. It’s comfortable without being bland. It’s really a great park.

I’m delighted to find this amazing gem so close to my home, and stunned that I’d never encountered it before. Just goes to show there’s a whole lot of Chicago left for me to see.

Swing!

Links:

  • The Chicago Park District’s page for the park

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  • Two Hospital Chapels

    I found and visited both of these around the same time, back in the fall. They’re both Mid-Century Modern buildings, but separated by about fifteen years and widely divergent in their styles.

    The first is one of those buildings that’s hidden in plain sight: St. Joseph’s Hospital, easily visible from Lakeshore Drive across Lincoln Park, and somewhat famous for its marching walls of blue diamonds. Owing to my recurring inability to get out of the house early in the morning, I have yet to get a decent, sunlit view of the building’s public eastern face, so here’s a detail shot.

    Saint Joseph Hospital, Chicago

    Saint Joseph Hospital

    Within, the 11th floor Dan Ryan Memorial Chapel is a consummate piece of 1960s architecture.

    The narrow wings of the Y-shaped hospital tower allow the chapel to have faceted glass walls its long sides.

    Saint Joseph Hospital

    Saint Joseph Hospital

    Various period details tie the place together, though careless addition of can lights and fire safety equipment have damaged the clean integrity of the design.

    St. Joseph's chapel

    Saint Joseph Hospital Dan Ryan Memorial Chapel

    Saint Joseph Hospital Dan Ryan Memorial Chapel

    The second chapel is west of the Loop, out on W. Division Street, at the Saint Mary Campus medical center.

    Saint Mary Campus hospital chapel

    The chapel, located on the second story, is as Brutalist as the exterior of the building. Upon entering, I immediately dubbed it “Our Lady of Board-Formed Concrete”. The design takes great advantage of the raw, rough-edged nature of the material.

    Saint Mary Campus hospital chapel

    Saint Mary Campus hospital chapel

    Saint Mary Campus hospital chapel

    The late 1960s and early 1970s tended to be particularly brutal in their depictions of Jesus on the cross. The angular styles common to the time really played up the agony of the crucifixion.

    Saint Mary Campus hospital chapel

    The chapel has a tall faceted glass window, but it’s located outside the chapel itself. Stranger still, it’s in a very narrow, high space where it can only be appreciated by standing beneath it and craning one’s neck upwards.

    Saint Mary Campus hospital chapel

    Saint Mary Campus hospital chapel